Common Misconceptions About Health and Wellness

by | Oct 18, 2023 | Insights

9 MIN READ

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Many positives accompanied the rise of social media, like the sharing of knowledge and democratization of creation. The looming negative is hard to ignore, however: Misinformation spreading rampantly.

With this in mind, consumers have a broad range of misconceptions about health and wellness — and brands have misconceptions about how the consumer views health and wellness. For a deep dive, check out our white paper DEFINING HEALTH & WELLNESS, AND THE BARRIERS TO CHANGE — where we further explore these misconceptions.

 

How Does Media Shape Consumer Perception of Wellness?

 


“People under the age of 25 tend to turn to parents for advice, while nearly 20% of people surveyed will not consult anyone on lifestyle decisions. Google is consulted far more often than any person, with social media and influencers ranked shortly after.”
Source: Defining Health & Wellness, And The Barriers To change


 

Our survey revealed the trending behavior for the past few years: Google, influencers, and friends have more impact on the health and wellness choices of adults under 45.

 

How Do Different Demographics View Health and Wellness?

Demographics views on health and wellness

Black and Hispanic communities had the biggest attitude shifts, with respondents more likely to prioritize their mental health than their White counterparts. Both communities have a strong history of stigma when it comes to seeking mental health treatment. To learn more about how these communities perceive health and wellness today, check out our blog: How do consumers define wellness?

Asian-American communities deal with similar stigma, and Michael Huynh reveals that “mental health is not being embraced with open arms compared to other racial/ethnic groups.” (UCI Public Health)

Keep these cultural perspectives in mind to reach your audience. But remember to do psychographic research as well and identify: What brings your audience together despite demographic differences?

 

Are There Any Differences Between Male and Female Perspectives on Health and Wellness?

“Women in the household may not be running a hospital or practice, but they are certainly ensuring that everyone under their care gets the medical attention they need. They make the appointments. They administer the meds. And they stay on top of everyone in the household to make sure health is not forgotten.”

Men mostly defined health as physical fitness, mental health, and nutrition— while women mostly defined health as mental health, routine check-ups, and nutrition. Basically: Health starts inward and goes outward for women and it’s the opposite for men. Healthy eating and mental health seem to be the key commonalities.

When it comes to wellness, the perspectives of both genders converge even more. Men prioritize Emotional, Physical, and Financial Wellness while women prioritize Physical, Emotional, and Financial Wellness — in that order.

“Women in the household may not be running a hospital or practice, but they are certainly ensuring that everyone under their care gets the medical attention they need. They make the appointments. They administer the meds. And they stay on top of everyone in the household to make sure health is not forgotten.”

Ultimately, the genders define health and wellness pretty similarly. Keep in mind, however, that women are the health decision-makers of their home. And our findings revealed that women prioritize men’s health more than men themselves do; for instance, 61% of women responded that prostate health is important compared to just 44% of men.

 


 

To learn more, check out our latest white paper: DEFINING HEALTH & WELLNESS, AND THE BARRIERS TO CHANGE.

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